Today, February 23, the Mitt Romney campaign released a statement providing quotes from a number of sources regarding his tax plan:

“If Romney does become the Republican nominee, he would certainly be running on the boldest GOP agenda since Reagan ’80, maybe ever.” – James Pethokoukis, American Enterprise Institute

National Review: “It’s a pro-growth plan. It improves incentives to work, save, and invest, and should thus modestly increase the economy’s long-run growth. It modestly improves the tax structure by reducing the tax code’s bias against saving and investment, particularly when that saving and investment is done in corporate form. Romney’s plan should also be expected to simplify the tax code, on balance.” (Editorial, “Two Cheers For Romney’s Tax Plan,” National Review, 2/23/12)

American Enterprise Institute’s James Pethokoukis: “If Romney does become the Republican nominee, he would certainly be running on the boldest GOP agenda since Reagan ’80, maybe ever.” (James Pethokoukis, “New Romney Tax Plan Goes The Full Reagan,” The American, 2/22/12)

  • Pethokoukis: “Romney 2.0 goes the full Reagan.” (James Pethokoukis, “New Romney Tax Plan Goes The Full Reagan,” The American, 2/22/12)

Sen. Pat Toomey Said Romney Had A “Strong Pro-Growth Tax Reform Plan.” “More importantly: @MittRomney’s strong pro-growth tax reform plan, very much like mine.” (Sen. Pat Toomey, Twitter, 2/23/12)

The Wall Street Journal: “The Romney proposal will also provide a tax contrast with Rick Santorum. The Pennsylvania Senator favors a top tax rate of 28% but he also wants to triple the child tax credit to $3,000. He’d have a hard time credibly doing both without blowing up the budget because the tax credit has almost no revenue feedback effect. It’s a social gesture with little or no impact on economic growth. Meanwhile, on corporate taxes, Mr. Romney’s tax cut applies to all companies equally. Mr. Santorum would cut the rate in half for most companies, except manufacturers would pay 0%. This is a form of industrial policy that would have every company lobbying to qualify as a manufacturer and would defeat the tax neutrality that is a main goal of tax reform.” (Editorial, “Romney’s Tax Reboot,” The Wall Street Journal, 2/23/12)

Americans For Tax Reform: “Governor Mitt Romney released ‘version 2.0’ of his tax plan this morning. Here is ATR’s take. … Eliminate the death tax and the AMT. … This is a clear ‘win’ in the Romney plan. … Lower the corporate income tax rate to 25%.  This is good as far as it goes. … Move from worldwide to territorial taxation.  This is a great move.” (Ryan Ellis, “Romney Tax Plan 2.0 Moves In The Right Direction,” Americans For Tax Reform, 2/22/12)

The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin: “Taken in its totality, it is the most detailed of any of the candidates’ plans. … And, in stark contrast to Obama and Santorum, Romney doesn’t make the tax code worse by adding special give-aways.” (Jennifer Rubin, “Romney’s Tax Plan: Not Obama, Not Santorum, Maybe Doable,” The Washington Post, 2/22/12)

The Wall Street Journal’s Paul Gigot: “Specifically, Mr. Romney will point out that Mr. Santorum’s proposal for a zero tax rate for manufacturing is a form of industrial policy that isn’t much different than the kind practiced by Mr. Obama in picking energy winners and losers. This is right on the merits, and it will let Mr. Romney stand against another lobbying free-for-all to define what qualifies as ‘manufacturing.’” (Paul Gigot, “Romney Vs. Santorum On Taxes,” The Wall Street Journal, 2/22/12)

National Review’s Reihan Salam: “I actually think there is much to be said for the new Romney tax proposal, particularly if it does a very thorough job of stripping out tax expenditures that benefit high earners. It bears close resemblance to the excellent Growth and Investment Tax Plan.” (Reihan Salam, “So How Should We Interpret The New Romney Tax Plan?,” National Review, 2/22/12)

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